Friday, June 28, 2013

Riots are Looming

I said this is what will happen recently in another blog.  No special knowledge involved. just plain and simple observation of previous history, the media and existing racial tendencies in this country.  Yes you ca count on it.  If George Zimmerman is acquitted, American cities will burn and white people will be killed by blacks in retaliation.  

Ex-Chicago Cop: Zimmerman Acquittal to Cause Race Riots

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Social unrest will “dwarf the Rodney King and the Martin Luther King riots”
Paul Joseph Watson
June 28, 2013
Following a number of tweets making threats to kill white people if George Zimmerman is acquitted of murdering Trayvon Martin, a former Chicago police officer warns that the outcome of the case could spark race riots in cities across America.
George Zimmerman. Image: Wikimedia Commons
As Infowars reported yesterday, following the woeful performance of Rachel Jeantel, the state’s so-called “star witness,” a number of Twitter users took to the social network to express their intention to kill white people in retaliation for Zimmerman going free.
Tweets included remarks such as “If Zimmerman get off ima shoot the first #hispanic/white I see,” and “If they don’t kill Zimmerman Ima kill me a cracka.”
In an article entitled, America Will See Its Worst Race Riot Yet This Summer, Crime File News’ Paul Huebl remarks that the case against Zimmerman should never have been filed in the first place and that when the trial inevitably collapses with Zimmerman’s acquittal, “I fully expect organized race rioting to begin in every major city to dwarf the Rodney King and the Martin Luther King riots of past decades.”
Huebl is a licensed private detective and a former Chicago police officer.
“If you live in a large city be prepared to evacuate or put up a fight to win. You will need firearms, fire suppression equipment along with lots of food and water. Police resources will be slow and outgunned everywhere,” writes Huebl, adding, “America may see some combat related population control like we’ve not seen since the Civil War. Martial Law can’t be far behind complete with major efforts at gun grabbing.”
Huebl is not the only prominent voice to express fears that the outcome of the trial could lead to widespread social disorder.
Columnist and former senior presidential advisor Pat Buchanan warned last month that, “The public mind has been so poisoned that an acquittal of George Zimmerman could ignite a reaction similar to that, 20 years ago, when the Simi Valley jury acquitted the LAPD cops in the Rodney King beating case.”
Political Strategist Charles D. Ellison also warns that, “There is the risk of a flashpoint as intense as the aftermath of that fateful Los Angeles police brutality verdict in 1992,” if Zimmerman walks free.
“At that time, many underestimated the potential for social unrest. And a bit over 20 years to the date, many could be making the same miscalculation at this very moment. The ingredients are there in Sanford and they loom large nationally, from an economy barely managing its own recovery to an unemployment rate that’s much higher than it should be, particularly for African-Americans,” adds Ellison.
Some are even asking whether the law should be ignored and Zimmerman convicted simply to avoid race riots.
“Regardless of whether or not Zimmerman acted in self defense, a large segment of the population, particularly the black population, are demanding Zimmerman be punished. And if they don’t have their demands satisfied, it is possible they might riot,” writes a poster at the Aesops Retreat forum. “So would it be appropriate to consider potential riots when deciding on whether or not to prosecute Zimmerman? Or should justice be blind and follow the rule of law?”

Bert & Ernie Are Out!

It looks like everyone is madly racing to bask in the glory of the SCOTUS ruling this week striking down the Defense of Marriage Act.   It now appears that Bert and Ernie and Sesame will be teaching pre-schoolers about human sexuality and the alternative choices to a mommy and daddy.  How cute is that!

Bert & Ernie are a couple!

Whuda thunk it..........

Apologies for the witness and her obviously racially biased struggle to be heard.

The apologist pieces like those below are beginning to flow.  All stops are being pulled to craft and shape the public's opinion toward the clearly biased version of George Zimmerman's guilt by the media.  

Why Black People Understand Rachel Jeantel by Christina Coleman


If ever I thought myself objective and unbiased, the George Zimmerman trial is definitely not that moment.
So let's cut to the chase. Any attorney, jury member, judge or white person in that courtroom is not going to understand Rachel Jeantel. And I don't expect them to.
In fact, I certainly, like my fellow writer Rachel Samara, understand why white people wouldn't like Rachel.
She's hard. She's black. And your assumptions about her background and lack of education make you feel like you are better, somehow. That her testimony, no matter how powerful and impactful it may be to this trial, is implausible. Weak, maybe? Let's impeach her.
But maybe the reason white people don't understand Rachel Jeantel has something more to do with white privilege then, what they would call, Rachel's capricious nature.
Let's for one second try to understand why Rachel is "angry" (read emotional), "hood" (read blunt), and "unintelligent" (read multilingual).
The thing is, what white people see in Rachel has little to do about her own issues, and more to say about the America that white people are blind to. Let's take her testimony on not calling the police, for example.
Rachel told defense attorney Don West that she didn't call the police after she heard the scuffle between Trayvon Martin and the man that was following him for numerous reasons. First, she believed that he was right near his "daddy's house," and that Tracy would help him. She also was under the impression that, if it were a life or death situation, someone would certainly come to his aid. But as West continued his questioning, riddled with nuances to throw Rachel off track, the glaring subtext of this all became clear.
Don West doesn't understand why Rachel didn't call the police when she heard a struggle. Rachel, who is a black woman, doesn't call the police. Why? Black people and police officers don't mix.
The tottering seesaw between black people and law enforcement leaves us in a position where we are afraid to call the cops because we're not exactly sure they are on our side. And in an age where police responding to calls for help will still result in an innocent black person's incarceration or death, it's difficult to know who to trust or turn to during times of need.
Distrust in police stems from decades of being disenfranchised and treated unfairly by those who were supposed to protect us. And yes, I'm taking it there...distrust in white people. Government. LAPD. NYPD. Most recently, the White Plains police department in Westchester County, NY who murdered an innocent black man named Kenneth Chamberlain when his Life Aid medical necklace was inadvertently triggered and they were summoned to his home. And just last week, the police officer in Detroit, Michigan who shot and killed 7-year-old Aiyana Jones was set free after a mistrial. Not to mention the killers of Amadou Diallo or the torturers of Abner Louiama.
The point is, black people can understand Rachel's hesitancy when it came to contacting the police because the fear and doubt that comes with dealing with law enforcement is as entwined into the tapestry of our culture as is our slavery past.
It's not that Rachel can't be trusted. In fact, her testimony has remained solid and consistent throughout her nearly seven hours of questioning.
But, the initial fear of not knowing what would happen is something that black people can understand. And overlook. Which is something that someone with white privilege wouldn't exactly grasp.
But what's more are the cultural differences between white and black people.
When asked why she omitted the words "creepy ass cracker" and "nigga" when speaking in front of Sybrina Fulton about her son's last moments, she simply told the court that she didn't want to disrespect her.
As West looked at her in utter disbelief, Rachel looked back, unwavering. How could he not understand that she couldn't bring herself to upset someone who had just lost a child? Better yet, curse in front of adults.
Note: Disrespect to elders in the black and especially Caribbean communities is almost as bad as cursing the Lord.
And speaking of that word "nigga," the court might not understand Trayvon and Rachel's casual use of the word because of how often, no matter how controversial, it is used in our communities.
So aside from the argument that we took the power out of a degrading word and made it into a term of endearment, it's used so much that it's become a substitute for identifiers such as "that guy," or "him," etc.
And for Don West to argue that the use of the word "nigga" was racial for Trayvon is incomprehensible, especially because he used it on a person who was not of African descent.
For Rachel, these little cultural differences get lost in translation. And instead of trying to understand her, people are reducing the miscommunication to semantics, what they call her broken "Kings English," and her anger. Without even realizing that she comes from a home where Creole is her first language, or that her friend was killed just seconds after he last spoke to her. Wouldn't you be frustrated in front of a court that refuses to understand you?
But most importantly, if there is anything that black people can understand that those judging her are not, it's the loss of life without justice.
And as Rachel Jeantel sits on the stand, nervous, mumbling and annoyed, it's not that she's just a "hoodrat with no media training from a hostile environment."
It's just that your world and our world are...excuse the cliche...worlds apart.
And that, my friends, was never Rachel Jeantel's fault.

The smearing of Rachel Jeantel 

 The smearing of Rachel Jeantel Rachel Jeantel, the witness that was on the phone with Trayvon Martin just before he died, gives her testimony to the prosecution during George Zimmerman's trial in Seminole circuit court in Sanford, Fla. Wednesday, June 26, 2013. Zimmerman has been charged with second-degree murder for the 2012 shooting death of Trayvon Martin.(AP Photo/Orlando Sentinel, Jacob Langston, Pool) (Credit: AP)

Rachel Jeantel is a 19-year-old Florida woman. On Facebook and Twitter, she’s been known to post photos of her nails and talk about drinking. She is also the last person to have spoken with Trayvon Martin before George Zimmerman shot him to death last year, the woman who was on the phone with him when his fateful encounter unfolded. She is known in the justice system as Witness #8 in Zimmerman’s trial. She is, in fact, the prosecution’s key witness. But you’d be forgiven if you’d gotten the impression recently that she was sitting up there to defend herself.
Jeantel does not fit the comfortable image of the grieving girl. As Rachel Samara wrote Wednesday in Global Grind, “A predominantly white jury is not going to like Rachel Jeantel,” a girl “who has no media training and who is fully entrenched in a hostile environment.” There is confusion over whether or not she was Martin’s girlfriend, which eradicates her chances of being depicted as a devastated young quasi-widow. On the stand, she has been blunt, hostile and at times seemingly confused. Online, she has a documented history that includes partying. She is not thin or blond or demure. So there goes her credibility.
This week, the Smoking Gun carefully picked through her social media history, uncovering such bombshells as a recent image of what she described as her “court nails.” She has posted photos of liquor bottles and declared that “wowww I need a drink” and tweeted “party time let get high” [sic]. The Smoking Gun also reports that she’s posted “a sexually suggestive series of photos,” “made references to Martin’s death, referred to acquaintances as ‘bitch’ and ‘nigga,’ and wrote about having ‘jackass lawyers on my ass.’” She has in recent days deleted several dozen of her more damning tweets. And so Smoking Gun commenters have, in their turn, declared that she’s not just a “thug” but “proof the gene pool NEEDS more chlorine!” … “and maybe some arsenic too.” Funnily enough, there’s no mention on the site that on Monday she also posted, “I’m a friend god damn it,” or that she loves Jill Scott and Janet Jackson.

Here is what is true about Jeantel. She has publicly admitted to underage drinking and getting high. She is a poor speller (at least on social media). Her way with words is not calculated to win favor – she has testified that Martin told her “a creepy-ass cracker” was following him. She has responded to the defense’s line of questioning with an icy “You got it?” and “That’s retarded, sir.” The Daily News describes her diction as “often difficult-to-understand” and says it’s “cringe-worthy” and “humiliating” that she couldn’t read a letter out loud on the stand because she says, “I don’t read cursive.” Jeantel has also admitted to law enforcement that she lied about her initial claim that she didn’t attend Martin’s funeral because she was hospitalized at the time; she now says that she felt too “guilty” to face his parents and “didn’t want to see the body.” She admits that at the beginning of the investigation, she said she was under 18, because she didn’t want to get involved. She is unpolished and emotional.
So is she a reliable witness? That’s yet to be determined. And watching her struggling to articulate “the sound of wet grass” to the jury, you can see not just her frustration but defense lawyer Don West’s undisguised exasperation. But when outlets like MSN gleefully seize upon the fact that she’s posting photographs of her nails, they invite exactly the kind of troubling and deeply offensive conclusions about what a “bitch,” what “ghetto trash,” what an “ugly ho” “buffalo” she is, that they have been racking up ad nauseam.

Thursday, June 27, 2013

A Creepy Ass Cracker

As the Trayvon Martin murder trial progresses, the revelations of evidence that is being revealed is amazing. The state's star witness claims that she was on the phone with Martin the night he was killed and that he referred to George Zimmerman following him as some "creepy ass cracker." Yet on follow up questioning by the defense, she states that she does not believe that the term is either racial derogatory, racist or insulting.

This is what America has come to people. Just this week, Paula Deen is fighting for her life against accusations that she used the "N" word decades ago. Her business empire is collapsing and her partnerships and sponsors are withdrawing like rats from a sinking ship. And why? Because she has admitted that she used the word a long long time ago. She committed the unthinkable. She uttered the UN-utterable.she cannot be forgiven, she must be destroyed.

Yet is is perfectly alright for others to use these words and it is perfectly alright for them to use their own racially derogatory and outright racist terms when referring to white people. Not only can they use them, but they can sit in a court of law and testify to them and the American media doesn't even so much as blush. The media dutifully reports the statement being made by Trayvon MArtin on the night eh was killed and then move on to other things, while also neglecting the obvious ambiguity of the states witness and the changing stories between her interviews, depositions and testimony in court.

Today The Smoking Gun is reporting that this same witness scrubbed her Twitter account the night before testifying. But it looks like The Smoking Gun got screen shots of what was there before it was destroyed. Needless to say, these commentaries are probably actionable and worthy of subpoena. The only problem now is, they will have to be subpoenaed from The Smoking Gun. Could this be construed as evidence tampering? Probably not, but the Twitters that this witness posted prior to destroying the record, most certainly speak directly to her character and honesty or lack there of.

I guess it's alright for this underage female to boast of drinking with her friends that she refers to by the "N" word although spelled differently in her Tweets. But heaven forbid that a middle aged white woman tell the truth and admit to something that happened decades ago.

The Trayvon Martin trial once again reveals the racial truth of America. The reality is displayed fully and the American media manipulates the entire drama and the mainstream dumb masses of Americans never say a word. They are too afraid to. They are afraid of being singled out for scorn for having acknowledged the bias and racial hypocrisy that is rampant in this country.
Prosecution Witness: Martin Said He Thought 'Creepy Ass Cracker' Zimmerman Was Rapist

Testifying in the Geoge Zimmerman trial, prosecution witness Rachel Jeantel, 19, who says she was on the phone with Trayvon Martin before he was shot, explained that Martin told her that a “creepy ass cracker” was following him. According to Jeantel, Martin was worried that Zimmerman was a rapist, and said to “stop playing with him like that.” He also told Jeantel, she said, that the “n----- is now following him.”

Zimmerman Prosecution Star Witness: 'Cracker' Not a Racial Term

 Prosecution star witness Rachel Jeantel, the 19-year-old to whom Trayvon Martin was reportedly speaking while he was being followed by George Zimmerman, admitted again on the stand on Thursday that she had changed her testimony about Zimmerman’s words. Originally, she told police that after Martin asked Zimmerman why he was following him, Zimmerman answered, “What are you talking about?” Later, she changed that to, “What are you doing around here?”

As Kathi Belich of WFTV reports, “The first answer could indicate #Zimmermanon9 was not following Martin. The second answer could indicate he was following.”

Jeantel then testified that she had a friend write a letter to Sybrina Fulton, the mother of Trayvon Martin, stating that Zimmerman had said, “What are you doing around here?” According to Jeantel, the letter was signed “Diamond Eugene.” While Jeantel said in testimony that she heard Martin say “get off me,” the letter made no mention of that.

Jeantel also said that she remembered Martin family attorney Benjamin Crump asking her whether the case was racial, and answering yes. Only one problem: that wasn’t in the recording Crump provided the defense.
Jeantel said she didn't believe "cracker" was a racial term, after testifying yesterday that Martin said that a "creepy ass cracker" was following him.

The Latest contender for the Ray Lews NFL Busta Thug Award

Listening to Rush Limbaugh this morning you would have thought that the problem here is lack of a PR campaign by the NFL. Limbaugh's take on this news is that there have been 27 NFL players arrested since the Super Bowl. Something must be wrong! Adding that the NFL needs to get control of it's image and the culture of people they are recruiting.

Really? You really think so Rush?

This is yet another example of why I personally gave up and quit following the NFL a long, long time ago. Hells bells! Ray Lewis did the same thing in Atlanta in 2000 and he not only walked away from any serious prosecution, but he recently retired as an all time NFL All Star of the game and he will soon be enshrined in the NFL hall of fame. (Lower case intended.)

Former Patriots player Aaron Hernandez is probed in two more murders, law enforcement officials say

Former New England Patriots player Aaron Hernandez, already facing charges in a murder last week in North Attleborough, is also being investigated in connection with a July 2012 double murder in Boston, according to two law enforcement officials briefed on the investigation.
Investigators believe a fight broke out at Cure, a club in the South End, between two men and a group that included Hernandez.
The two men, Daniel Abreu and Safiro Furtado, friends who grew up in Cape Verde, left the club with three other men in a BMW sedan in the early morning hours of July 16, 2012.
Abreu, who was driving, stopped at a traffic light on Shawmut Avenue, about to make a left onto Herald Street, when a silver or gray SUV with Rhode Island license plates pulled alongside the sedan. Someone from the SUV opened fire, killing Abreu, 29, and Furtado, 28.
The men who were with them survived the attack and the killings were left unsolved.
The officials said investigators now believe that Odin Lloyd, the man Hernandez is charged with killing in a North Attleborough industrial park June 17, may have had information about Hernandez’s role in the double slaying.
“The motive might have been that the victim knew [Hernandez] might have been involved,” one of the officials said.

A Higher Call

A story worth telling. A true story that long ago should have been made into a movie.

This story is told in the book, A Higher Call, which is available through Amazon.

 Brown's Crippled B-17 Stalked by Stigler's ME-109

The 21-year old American B-17 pilot glanced outside his cockpit and froze. He blinked hard and looked again, hoping it was just a mirage. But his co-pilot stared at the same horrible vision. "My God, this is a nightmare," the co-pilot said. "He's going to destroy us," the pilot agreed.

The men were looking at a gray German Messerschmitt fighter hovering just three feet off their wingtip. It was five days before Christmas 1943, and the fighter had closed in on their crippled American B-17 bomber for the kill.

The B-17 pilot, Charles Brown, was a 21-year-old West Virginia farm boy on his first combat mission. His bomber had been shot to pieces by swarming fighters, and his plane was alone, struggling to stay in the skies above Germany . Half his crew was wounded, and the tail gunner was dead, his blood frozen in icicles over the machine guns.

But when Brown and his co-pilot, Spencer "Pinky" Luke, looked at the fighter pilot again, something odd happened. The German didn't pull the trigger. He stared back at the bomber in amazement and respect. Instead of pressing the attack, he nodded at Brown and saluted. What happened next was one of the most remarkable acts of chivalry recorded during World War II.

 USAAF Lt. Charles Brown

Charles Brown was on his first combat mission during World War II when he met an enemy unlike any other.

Revenge, not honor, is what drove 2nd Lt. Franz Stigler to jump into his fighter that chilly December day in 1943. Stigler wasn't just any fighter pilot. He was an ace. One more kill and he would win The Knight's Cross, German's highest award for valor.

Yet Stigler was driven by something deeper than glory. His older brother, August, was a fellow Luftwaffe pilot who had been killed earlier in the war. American pilots had killed Stigler's comrades and were bombing his country's cities.Stigler was standing near his fighter on a German airbase when he heard a bomber's engine. Looking up, he saw a B-17 flying so low it looked like it was going to land. As the bomber disappeared behind some trees, Stigler tossed his cigarette aside, saluted a ground crewman and took off in pursuit.

 Luftwaffe Major Franz Stigler

As Stigler's fighter rose to meet the bomber, he decided to attack it from behind. He climbed behind the sputtering bomber, squinted into his gun sight and placed his hand on the trigger. He was about to fire when he hesitated. Stigler was baffled. No one in the bomber fired at him.

He looked closer at the tail gunner. He was still, his white fleece collar soaked with blood. Stigler craned his neck to examine the rest of the bomber. Its skin had been peeled away by shells, its guns knocked out. One propeller wasn' turning. Smoke trailed from another engine. He could see men huddled inside the shattered plane tending the wounds of other crewmen.

Then he nudged his plane alongside the bomber's wings and locked eyes with the pilot whose eyes were wide with shock and horror.

Stigler pressed his hand over the rosary he kept in his flight jacket. He eased his index finger off the trigger. He couldn't shoot. It would be murder.

Stigler wasn't just motivated by vengeance that day. He also lived by a code. He could trace his family's ancestry to knights in 16th century Europe . He had once studied to be a priest. A German pilot who spared the enemy, though, risked death in Nazi Germany. If someone reported him, he would be executed.

Yet Stigler could also hear the voice of his commanding officer, who once told him: "You follow the rules of war for you -- not your enemy. You fight by rules to keep your humanity."

Alone with the crippled bomber, Stigler changed his mission. He nodded at the American pilot and began flying in formation so German anti-aircraft gunners on the ground wouldn't shoot down the slow-moving bomber. (The Luftwaffe had B-17s of its own, shot down and rebuilt for secret missions and training.) Stigler escorted the bomber over the North Sea and took one last look at the American pilot. Then he saluted him, peeled his fighter away and returned to Germany .

"Good luck," Stigler said to himself. "You're in God's hands now..." Franz Stigler didn't think the big B-17 could make it back to England and wondered for years what happened to the American pilot and crew he encountered in combat.

As he watched the German fighter peel away that December day, 2nd Lt. Charles Brown wasn't thinking of the philosophical connection between enemies. He was thinking of survival. He flew his crippled plan, filled with wounded, back to his base in England and landed with one of four engines knocked out, one failing and barely any fuel left. After his bomber came to a stop, he leaned back in his chair and put a hand over a pocket Bible he kept in his flight jacket. Then he sat in silence.

Brown flew more missions before the war ended. Life moved on. He got married, had two daughters, supervised foreign aid for the U.S. State Department during the Vietnam War and eventually retired to Florida .

Late in life, though, the encounter with the German pilot began to gnaw at him. He started having nightmares, but in his dream there would be no act of mercy. He would awaken just before his bomber crashed.

Brown took on a new mission. He had to find that German pilot. Who was he? Why did he save my life? He scoured military archives in the U.S. and England . He attended a pilots' reunion and shared his story. He finally placed an ad in a German newsletter for former Luftwaffe pilots, retelling the story and asking if anyone knew the pilot.

On January 18, 1990, Brown received a letter. He opened it and read: "Dear Charles, All these years I wondered what happened to that B-17, did she make it home? Did her crew survive their wounds? To hear of your survival has filled me with indescribable joy..."

It was Stigler.

He had had left Germany after the war and moved to Vancouver , British Columbia , in 1953. He became a prosperous businessman. Now retired, Stigler told Brown that he would be in Florida come summer and "it sure would be nice to talk about our encounter." Brown was so excited, though, that he couldn't wait to see Stigler. He called directory assistance for Vancouver and asked whether there was a number for a Franz Stigler. He dialed the number, and Stigler picked up.

"My God, it's you!" Brown shouted as tears ran down his cheeks. Brown had to do more. He wrote a letter to Stigler in which he said: "To say THANK YOU, THANK YOU, THANK YOU on behalf of my surviving crewmembers and their families appears totally inadequate."

 Charles Brown, with his wife, Jackie (left), with Franz Stigler, with his wife, Hiya.

One of Brown's friends was there to record the summer reunion. Both men looked like retired businessmen: they were plump, sporting neat ties and formal shirts. They fell into each other' arms and wept and laughed. They talked about their encounter in a light, jovial tone.

The mood then changed. Someone asked Stigler what he thought about Brown. Stigler sighed and his square jaw tightened. He began to fight back tears before he said in heavily accented English: "I love you, Charlie."

Stigler had lost his brother, his friends and his country. He was virtually exiled by his countrymen after the war. There were 28,000 pilots who fought for the German air force. Only 1,200 survived.

The war cost him everything. Charlie Brown was the only good thing that came out of World War II for Franz. It was the one thing he could be proud of. The meeting helped Brown as well, says his oldest daughter, Dawn Warner.

Brown and Stigler became pals. They would take fishing trips together. They would fly cross-country to each other homes and take road trips together to share their story at schools and veterans' reunions. Their wives, Jackie Brown and Hiya Stigler, became friends.

Brown's daughter says her father would worry about Stigler's health and constantly check in on him.

"It wasn't just for show," she says. "They really did feel for each other. They talked about once a week." As his friendship with Stigler deepened, something else happened to her father, Warner says "The nightmares went away."

Brown had written a letter of thanks to Stigler, but one day, he showed the extent of his gratitude. He organized a reunion of his surviving crew members, along with their extended families. He invited Stigler as a guest of honor.

During the reunion, a video was played showing all the faces of the people that now lived -- children, grandchildren, relatives -- because of Stigler's act of chivalry. Stigler watched the film from his seat of honor.

"Everybody was crying, not just him," Warner says.

Stigler and Brown died within months of each other in 2008. Stigler was 92, and Brown was 87. They had started off as enemies, became friends, and then something more.

After he died, Warner was searching through Brown's library when she                            came across a book on German fighter jets. Stigler had given the book to Brown. Both were country boys who loved to read about planes.

Warner opened the book and saw an inscription Stigler had written to Brown:

In 1940, I lost my only brother as a night fighter. On the 20th of December,
4 days before Christmas, I had the chance to save a B-17 from her destruction,
a plane so badly damaged it was a wonder that she was still flying.
The pilot, Charlie Brown, is for me as precious as my brother was.
Thanks Charlie.

Your Brother, Franz